Sunday, January 13, 2013

FABRIC POTHOLDER TUTORIAL...

I was recently contacted by my Mother-in-Law, who had left her favorite potholders behind at a party and was wondering if I knew the "recipe" for making new ones.  She remembered the combination on her own before I could help her (and sent me a few for Christmas), but I realized this was the perfect opportunity to share a fast little project - perfect for any kitchen, and easy enough for a quick gift!
A pair of happy Matryoshka doll potholders matches the unique measuring cup set I found for my daughter, this Christmas...

RECIPE FOR FABRIC POTHOLDERS:

*  1/2 YARD OF TWO DIFFERENT FABRICS, WILL YIELD THREE 8-1/2" SQ. (FINISHED SIZE) TWO-COLOR POTHOLDERS
or
FIVE DIFFERENT SCRAPS OF FABRIC, CUT TO 9" SQUARE, PER POTHOLDER;

*  COTTON BATTING, SUCH AS (WARM AND NATURAL) or
COMBINATION OF COTTON BATTING AND INSUL-BRITE (by WARM AND NATURAL);

 * BASIC SEWING SUPPLIES - MACHINE, THREAD, PINS, SCISSORS, ETC.
A.  Gather your fabrics and cut the following:

* FOR "SCRAPPY" POTHOLDER - 5) different fabrics, cut at 9" X 9" (scrappy assortment was used in tutorial, for ease in seeing how these are layered)
or
** FOR TWO-COLOR POTHOLDER 3) pieces Fabric A, cut at 9" X 9"; and 2) pieces Fabric B, cut at 9" X 9"

B.  If using a combination of Insul-Brite and Cotton Batting, cut one of each, 9" X 9", for each potholder.  If you are using the Insul-Brite, you MUST use a piece of Cotton Batting with it...NOT two layers of Insul-Brite.  The cotton works to wick the moisture away from the insulated piece.

If using Cotton Batting, cut two pieces 9" X 9" for each potholder.
(Note:  Either combination will work great - the Insul-Brite gives a bit more insulation but, if you don't expect to be carrying large, really hot items across football length kitchens, then two layers of Cotton Batting will work just fine.)

C.  Leaving one square flat, fold remaining four pieces in half, and iron.  ** For a two-color potholder, leave your third piece of Fabric A flat - you will have four ironed pieces...two of each color.

D.  Layer one 9" X 9" square of Insul-Brite, with a square of cotton batting on top (or two squares of Cotton Batting).
A.  Place flat fabric piece, right side up, on top of Cotton Batting and Insul-Brite.

B.  With folded edge toward center, on diagonal (raw edges to outside edge of square), place first "triangle of fabric".  You can work either clockwise or counter-clockwise.

C.  Add second triangle, overlapping first, as shown (folded edge on diagonal).  If using only two fabrics, you will alternate your two colors in this section.

D.  Add third triangle, as shown (folded edge on diagonal, once again).
A.  Add fourth folded triangle - this will cover the portion of your first triangle that was showing (Remember the white/blue "paisley?  It's hidden under there, now).

B.  Flip up right edge of triangle you just added to reveal the first triangle placed in stack.  Flip back (or "up") left edge of that triangle, as well.

C.  Lay right edge of last triangle added (black/pink hearts) under first triangle (white/blue paisley - which is still flipped up)...

D.  Flip left edge of first triangle back down over last triangle added.  The placement of these triangles gets easier once you've done one or two.
A.  Pin along center flaps, close to corner edges, to hold in place (if needed).  With 1/4" - 1/2" seam (I use the side of my presser foot - you just want to make sure you catch all layers in your seam allowance), sew around entire outside edge of potholder.  Pivot at each corner and take three to four diagonal stitches before continuing on your next straight side seam (this makes for a smoother corner when turned).

B.  Clip corners on the diagonal - you may also trim a little on each side near corner, to alleviate bulk.
A - D.  Going through center of your four triangles, turn your potholder right side out.  Push corners as far as you can get them by hand...
A - B.  Chopsticks - they're not just for Chinese food!  Being careful not to poke a hole through your fabrics, gently poke corners out to full potential.  Press both sides of your potholder.
A.  Pin flaps in place on front, to keep from shifting while stitching.

B.  Topstitch 1/4" around all four sides of your potholder.

C - D.  Either handstitch a little "X" in the very center of your potholder, to keep the flaps closed, or find a decorative stitch on your machine, and take the easy way out. 
Here's to you, Happy Cooker, and a fabulously fun kitchen ensemble in 2013 ~

10 comments:

Jackie said...

Oh those are very cool! I will have to give it a try! Thank you for posting!

Createology said...

Tanya Dear you are BRILLIANT! I am going to make these for some easy gifts. Thank you sew very much. Creative Hearts are Happy Hearts...

oldgreymare said...

Terrific tutorial <3

Dorthe said...

Had to look some extra times to figure out ,what you did.... lol.
They are great ,and it is a fantastic tutorial,-Thank you dear Tanya!
Guess your mother-in-law was really happy!
Hugs,Dorthe

Anonymous said...

These are gorgeous and I would make some if I had a sewing machine - no I wouldn't!!!

Great job, my friend!!!!!

Colleen Myler

Elisabeth said...

Great tutorial Tanya! I love matryoshka dolls :)

Mary said...

Love these! You are so clever. I'm going to bring you some wine glass cozies that my mother-in-law used to make so you can figure them out for me! I love them and would love to know how to make them! (I think you should come to visit and show me how to use my fancy Brother embroidery machine!)

Cindy said...

Awesome!! These are so great, I still can't sew a lick, but great tutorial!
xoxo
Cindy

Sheila Bennett said...

What size needle did you use and what foot? I used a quilting needle and my walking foot and still had trouble getting all of it under the foot to sew. Next time I guess I need to cut off more of the seam allowance. I love the idea and it was easy for a beginner like me! Thanks so much.

Tanya @ Bead and Needle said...

Hi, Sheila...I do hope you find this comment, as you are listed as a "No Reply" Blogger, meaning I have no way to get ahold of you personally. Excellent question, and something I took for granted, and should have probably addressed in the tutorial. I use a standard sewing foot for assembly - I use the side of that foot for a sewing guide. I would suggest a size 14 needle if you are having problems. I just did 2 sets of these last week, for gifts, and the only thing I had in the house was a 12 - I did get through all the fabrics, but noticed there was a little "noise" in doing so, meaning there was some resistance with the needle size (it just had a harder time getting through all the fabrics). A 14 should work great for you for this.

I then used a 1/4" foot for the top stitching around the edge...again, your standard sewing machine foot would work fine for this, as well.

Please feel free to contact me direct if you have any other questions - my email address can be found on the right hand side of my blog, with the envelope picture. Have a fabulous week! Tanya